• Rikki Lambert

Ouyen area, Irymple lead as outer Horsham falters in Victorian regional population growth



The greater Mildura area was recorded positive population growth in the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics data, with Irymple the fastest-growing district, rising 2.1 per cent.


Irymple was Victoria's 19th fastest growing regional area (ie outside of Greater Melbourne or Geelong), while the 'Mildura region' grew 1.4 per cent in the data ending at June 2020.


The 'Mildura Region' includes Ouyen, running from the SA-Victoria border and down to Wyperfeld National Park. The region's growth was attributed largely to overseas migration and migration within Australia, not natural population growth.


Victoria's fastest-growing area was Mickelham-Yuroke, gaining 32.8 per cent, followed by Rockbank-Mount Cottrell in the Melton-Bacchus Marsh district, with 29.1 per cent.


Delacome, in the Ballarat district, was the fastest-growing in regional Victoria, rising 8.7 per cent and Alfredton (6.9).


Conversely, the region outside of central Horsham suffered a 1.5 per cent population loss in the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics data, the fifth-biggest fall in the state.


The decline was attributed most to internal migration within Australia to other areas and a reduction in natural population growth.


However, Horsham itself grew 0.9 per cent over the same period.


Other regions in the Flow family to experience population declines, albeit slight, were Stawell (0.2 per cent), Buloke and Loddon (0.4 per cent) and Yarriambiack (0.6 per cent).


Healesville - Yarra Glen's population remained unchanged.


Statewide, Victoria had a natural population increase of 36,212 people (births over deaths), just 2,243 growth in Australian internal migration but 61,335 more from overseas migration.


Internal migration within Australia hit Dandenong hardest, losing 1,156 in Dandenong and 848 in Springvale. Barely any regional areas outside greater Melbourne featured in the internal migration negative figures, confirming what other sources have told FlowNews24 has been a 'tree change' movement in full swing well before the COVID-19 pandemic's effects have been fully observed.